Posted on

When It Comes to Raising Food, Are You Part of the Inner Circle?

ForbesBuilding

Whether or not you are part of the inner circle, may determine how aggressive you pursue alternatives to the industrial food chain – read on. The motto of Forbes Magazine is “The Capitalist Tool.” True to its motto, Forbes is hosting the first ever AgTech Summit in Salinas, California on July 8-9, 2015. Now, before you get too excited about going, the event is by invitation only. Forbes is looking for several hundred of the smartest minds from Silicon Valley and global agriculture to tackle some of the world’s most critical challenges. Forbes wants to connect agriculture with high tech and capital. Smart minds, technology and capital have brought many things…

Read more

Posted on

Food Hardship – Is the Solution Food Gardening?

AmpleHarvestRegisteredFoodPantries

The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) recently published its 2014 National, State and Local Index of Food Hardship. Food hardship is a state of being in which there is struggle to put food on the table.  According to the report, food hardship afflicted between 17.2 and 18.6 percent of Americans at various times over the last seven years – that’s between 55 and 61 million people. Here are some of the highlights: Mississippi has the highest food hardship rate of any state at 24.7 percent. About one out of every 4 people in Mississippi is food challenged. North Dakota has the lowest food hardship rate of any state at…

Read more

Posted on

How to Recognize a Farming Short Circuit – a Precursor to a Food Crisis

CornPiles

March 31, 2015 │USDA, Washington D.C.  Every year at this time, the USDA issues an estimate of what acres will be planted to the four (4) major crops for the coming year. It is not common knowledge that the market-play of the four major crops is a precursor to a food crisis. They are called major crops because they dominate – by acres – the land farmed in the U.S. – and to some extent the world. America’s 913 million acres of farmland are divided into two main categories – cropland and pasture. Of the 913 million acres, 324 million are in cropland and 589 million in pasture. On some…

Read more

Posted on

What is COFCO? What Does It Want From America?

soybean-field

The designation COFCO may mean little to most Americans. Yet, this enterprise looks to own, export and control as much American agricultural production as it is allowed. COFCO means China Cereals, Oils and Foodstuffs Corporation.  Founded in 1952, it is one of the largest state-owned enterprises of the Chinese people. COFCO is a sprawling conglomerate chosen by Fortune Magazine as one the world’s top 500 enterprises. Among other things, COFCO – in its mandate to underpin Chinese food security – looks to own, warehouse, transport, plant, cultivate and process basic food items. In its own words, COFCO explains its mission: [quote]“COFCO plays a pivotal role as a bridge in the…

Read more

Posted on

The Indomitable Human Spirit Won’t Quit Seeking the Truth About Toxic Farming

900px-Flag_of_WHO_svg

IARC; Lyon, France – 3/17/15 │ Seventeen experts from 11 countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The IRC is a specialized research unit – with over 250 research experts – of the World Health Organization (see logo photo). The purpose of the effort was to assess the carcinogenicity of insecticides and the primary global herbicides (weed killers). Making international news was that one of the herbicides – determined to be a “probable carcinogen” – was Glyphosate. Glyphosate is the active ingredient in none other than Roundup. City folk know about Roundup as the chemical used around the house to kill weeds and unwanted grasses. However,…

Read more

Posted on

Are Solar Farms Going To Put Ethanol Out of Its Misery?

EthanolPlant

It’s no secret ethanol is a political child – whose sales are propped up by laws requiring ethanol be blended with gasoline. Similar to gasoline, ethanol prices have taken a plunge over the past year. Many folks try to avoid gas with ethanol arguing that it is an underperformer. The agricultural footprint of ethanol has raised objections by none other than Jose Graziano da Silva – head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). His position is simple – ethanol makes food more expensive and uses farmland that should be used to alleviate global hunger. Case in point is the U.S. Ethanol industry’s gigantic agricultural footprint. It takes…

Read more