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Urban Farming / Market Gardening News Round-up

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Touch the Soil News #233 The urban food landscape is one of the most dynamic spaces in the modern world. It is where minds meet, where creativity springs forth and where people have a fresh look at the future. Following are some recent examples of this exciting new paradigm. Futurists and Sustainable City Design Engineers are increasingly incorporating urban farming into city planning. Design engineers from Human Habitat ( http://www.humanhabitat.dk ) of Copenhagen, Denmark have put their heads together to design the Impact Farm. The farm is intentionally designed to take advantage of under-utilized urban space. It consists of an assembly-kit of pre-made components that when they are put together…

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News Roundup

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Touch the Soil News #214 Beer Breweries Illustrate Public Demand for Diversity The demand for a more diverse supply of agricultural products is not just in food, but drink as well. The Brewers Association recently announced that the U.S. now has over 4,000 breweries. That last time this was so was in 1873. California Leads in Curtailing Antibiotics in Farm Animals According to Reuters, California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a bill that sets the strictest government standards in the United States for the use of antibiotics in livestock production. The bill, which goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2018, will restrict the regular use of antibiotics for disease prevention…

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Farmigo – Another Opportunity for Market Garden Success

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Touch the Soil News #198 It would be nice if you, as a present or future market gardener, could just focus on production and not worry about who is going to buy what you produce. Marketing can be difficult if we don’t apply some common sense. However, taking time to think about who is going to buy what you produce – and who might be able to help you – is already a solid step towards success. The first thing is not to be daunted by the business challenges. American’s spend $1.5 trillion dollars a year to buy food – much of it devoid of quality, freshness and social responsibility.…

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