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Rooftop Gardening in Chongqing, China

Touch the Soil News #1038 (Feature photo – Chongqing Business District – CCA SA 3.0 Unported) Chongqing isn’t your normal city. With almost 31 million people in the region, this one city has a population just shy of 10 percent of the entire U.S. population. Getting fresh organic produce into a city of this size, which is anything but green, is a strong incentive to start farming rooftops. The city is embracing rooftop gardening, which comes with some problems as the rooftops can leak. Media giant Global Times briefly covers the topic here: http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1105475.shtml Want More? – Sign up below Special Deals Ahead…Sign up!

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When Farm & Grocery Store Merge

Touch the Soil News #999 (Feature photo – The Duchemin Brothers who merged their rooftop organic farm with their grocery store – photo courtesy of IGA Extra Famille Duchemin) A grocery store that grows the produce it sells on the roof of the store is a first for Canada. It came about when the IGA Extra Famille Duchemin grocery store was – as a part of a larger urban effort – required to install a green roof. Located in the Burrough of Ville Saint Laurent in Montreal, Canada, the urban farm is now making news. According to the Montreal Gazette, the owners of the grocery store decided to make an…

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Brooklyn Grange – World’s Largest Rooftop Farmers

Touch the Soil News #921 (Feature photo – Brooklyn Grange’s Rooftop Farm – photo courtesy of Brooklyn Grange) Brooklyn Grange in New York operates the world’s largest rooftop soil farms. The company currently farms a one-acre rooftop farm and another 1.5 acre rooftop farm. The two farms are capable of producing over 50,000 lbs. of fresh produce each year. Brooklyn Grange came into the news recently as they were awarded a new contract to farm another 40,000 square foot rooftop (almost 1 acre) on a new corporate office facility – the Corporate Commons Three. The Brooklyn Grange also operates New York City’s largest apiary – over 30 naturally-managed honey beehives…

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Getting Back on Track

Touch the Soil News #866 (Feature photo – Seoul University Student Press Building – photo public domain) Seoul National University (SNU) realizes the natural world is important for development and well-being. Seoul (South Korea) is the center of a metropolitan area of almost 26 million people. SNU has realized that rooftops can begin to serve as an answer to so much of the natural world that has been extinguished. SNU’s foray into a rooftop urban farm solves many things – rainwater storage, heat absorption, food production, save the bees, social gatherings and communications between people. In 2015, Thomson-Reuters ranked Seoul National University as the 31st most innovative institution in the…

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Grocery Store Sells Organic Produce from its Rooftop Farm

Touch the Soil News #758 (feature photo courtesy of Montreal IGA) Claiming to be the first grocery store in Canada, an IGA store in Montreal now has a 25,000 square foot roof garden (slightly over ½ acre) that produces over 30 different kinds of produce. Situated on a building that is LEED Gold certified. LEED certified buildings are resource efficient and use less water and energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The rooftop garden is irrigated with water collected from the store’s dehumidification system, which would otherwise be discarded. All the food grown is organically certified, harvested and sold in the store itself along with other organic produce. The roof-top…

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Up Top Acres – Wake Up Old Farmers

Touch the Soil News #296 There is probably not a day that goes by that some newspaper or farming magazine doesn’t talk about the aging of America’s farmers – mainstream farmers that is. The story line is essentially the same – a dire lack of young people getting into mainstream farming. Folks concerned about a lack of young farmers entering into industrial farming are living in the dark. Wake up and see the thousands of young people now following farm careers. The point today is that industrial farming is not the kind of farming that young people are choosing. They are choosing local, urban and market garden enterprises. What makes…

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